Basic Steps To Launch setup

Steps to follow for Launch setup:

  1. Create web property in Launch
  2. Set up Host
  3. Setup environment
  4. Install extension
  5. Deploy the script in web/mobile app
  6. Capture data in context data and use processing rule to map that data into analytics variable in case of mobile
  7. Capture the data in data element and put the value of data element in analytics variable
  8. Setup Rules
  9. Send Beacon
  10. Publish the Library

Launch guide : https://docs.adobe.com/content/help/en/launch/using/overview.html

Mobile app implementation guide:https://aep-sdks.gitbook.io/docs/getting-started/create-a-mobile-property

Check this if you are planning to upgrade from DTM to Launch: https://docs.adobe.com/content/help/en/launch/using/reference/upgrade/overview.html

Is an IP address considered “personal information” under the CCPA?

The California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) was enacted in early 2018 as a political compromise to stave off a poorly drafted, and plaintiff’s friendly ballot initiative.  Although the CCPA is scheduled to go into force in early 2020, there is a great deal of confusion regarding the requirements of the CCPA, including the degree to which it aligns with other privacy regulations such as the European General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”).

To help address that confusion, BCLP published the California Consumer Privacy Act Practical Guide, and is publishing a multi-part series that discusses the questions most frequently asked by clients concerning the CCPA.

Q. Is an IP address considered “personal information” under the CCPA?

Sometimes.

Personal information is defined by the CCPA as “information that identifies, relates to, describes, is capable of being associated with, or could reasonably be linked, directly or indirectly, with a particular consumer or household.” While the Act provides a list of examples of personal information – which explicitly includes “Internet Protocol Address” – it qualifies the examples by stating that they only fall within the definition of personal information if they identify, relate to, describe, are “capable of being associated with,” or “could be reasonably be linked” with a particular person. 

In order to determine whether an IP address is linked to a person, it is important to understand what an IP address represents.  Computers that access the internet are assigned either a static or a dynamic Internet Protocol (“IP”) address.  A static IP address does not change over time (i.e., it is dedicated to a particular computer to that network or user).  A dynamic IP address is assigned by a network when a computer connects and, thus, changes over time (e.g., each time that the user reconnects to the network). 

When examining whether a static or a dynamic IP address constitutes personal information, California courts may look to how European regulators viewed IP addresses in the context of the European GDPR’s definition of “personal data” which is substantially similar to the CCPA’s definition of “personal information.”  The Article 29 Working Party took the position that because static IP addresses do not change, and IP addresses can be used to identify the computer (or user), “[t]he possibility exists in many cases . . . of linking the user’s IP address to other personal data . . . that identify him/her, especially if use is made of invisible processing means to collect additional data on the user (for instance, using cookies containing a unique identifier)….”  The Working Party further recognized that because of the nature of dynamic IP addresses in some cases “a third party can get to know the dynamic IP address of a user but not be able to link it to other data concerning this person that would make his/her identification possible.”

Source: https://www.bclplaw.com/en-US/thought-leadership/privacy-faqs-is-an-ip-address-considered-personal-information.html

Adobe Analytics /Resources/Article/Post Index

Often we need to check for reference or to clear doubt what we know about Adobe Analytics. So I manage to maintain reference list in Excel for my personal use, today I thought to share this list on my blog that others can take benefit out of it too. Some of them are now outdated due to new advances in Adobe Analytics. I tried my best to give credit to actual author of the blog/article, even I tried to keep this list in order as much as possible and will keep on updating it as I come across other good reference links. Feel free to share your feedback or share the link which you want me to add in this list or do let me know if you have any questions.

Stay safe!

How To Implement Adobe Analytics in Hybrid App

For the purposes of this conversation, I’ll use the following definitions:

  • Native apps are built for a specific platform with the platform SDK, tools and languages, typically provided by the platform vendor (e.g. xCode/Objective-C for iOS, Eclipse/Java for Android, Visual Studio/C# for Windows Phone).
  • Mobile Web apps are server-side apps, built with any server-side technology (PHP, Node.js, ASP.NET) that render HTML that has been styled so that it renders well on a device form factor.
  • Hybrid apps, like native apps, run on the device, and are written with web technologies (HTML5, CSS and JavaScript). Hybrid apps run inside a native container, and leverage the device’s browser engine (but not the browser) to render the HTML and process the JavaScript locally. A web-to-native abstraction layer enables access to device capabilities that are not accessible in Mobile Web applications, such as the accelerometer, camera and local storage.

Hybrid apps are a great option for you if you:

  1. Want to target multiple mobile platforms
  2. Want to take advantage of device capabilities like geolocation, accelerometer or the camera
  3. Want the app to be useable when the device is offline
  4. Don’t need the advanced graphics performance that you can only get from a native app.

Hybrid apps are built with web technologies which means there are millions of web developers who already have the base skill set to build mobile apps.

Adobe Analytics tracking can be enabled for Hybrid app by creating 2 web property in Adobe Launch

How To mitigate the impact of ITP 2.1, ITP 2.2, and future ITP releases-Adobe Analytics

ITP 2.1 Capped client-side cookies that are placed on the browser using the document.cookie API to a seven-day expiry. Released February 21, 2019.
ITP 2.2 Drastically reduced the seven-day expiry cap to one day. Released April 24, 2019.

To mitigate the impact of ITP 2.1, ITP 2.2, and future ITP releases, complete the following tasks:

  1. Deploy the Experience Cloud ID (ECID) library to your pages.

The ECID library enables the people identification framework for Experience Cloud Core solutions. The ECID library allows you to identify same site visitors and their data in different Experience Cloud solutions by assigning persistent and unique identifiers. The ECID library will be updated frequently to help you mitigate any ITP-related changes that impact your implementation.

For ITP 2.1 and ITP 2.2, ECID library 4.3.0+ must be utilized for mitigation.

Check the link too: https://docs.adobe.com/content/help/en/id-service/using/reference/ecid-library-methods.html

2. Use Adobe’s CNAME and Enroll in Adobe Analytics’ Managed Certificate Program.

After installing the ECID library 4.3.0+, you can leverage Adobe Analytics’ CNAME and Managed Certificate Program. This program lets you implement a first-party certificate for first-party cookies at no charge. Leveraging CNAME will help customers mitigate the impact of ITP 2.1 and ITP 2.2.

If you are not leveraging CNAME, you can start the process by talking with your account representative and enrolling in the Adobe Managed Certificate Program .

How To Classify Page Load Time In Adobe Analytics

I captured page load time in prop as mentioned in this article:

https://theblog.adobe.com/measuring-site-speed-in-adobe-analytics/

s.prop1=s_getLoadTime();

This will assign the page load time, in tenths of a second, to prop1. For example, if my page took 3.75 seconds to load, I would get a raw value of 38 in the Page Load Time (prop1) report.

So I did it simple by capturing the page load time in seconds.

s.prop1=(s_getLoadTime()/10);

Following is the report which I start getting after this:

This data is not much helpful for the marketer to understand data so it needs to be classified into range.I decided to create a classification for prop1 as shown below:

There are 2 option to classify the data.

  • Classification file upload
  • Classification rule builder

In classification rule builder we have to use Regx.

Less than 1 Sec : \b(^0|0.[1-9])\b

1-3 Seconds: \b(^1|1.[0-9]|^2|2.[0-9])\b

3-5 Seconds: \b(^3|3.[0-9]|^4|4.[0-9])\b

5-10 Seconds: \b(^5|5.[0-9]|^6|6.[0-9]|^7|7.[0-9]|^8|8.[0-9]|^9|9.[0-9])\b

More than 10 Seconds: [1-9][0-9]

After processing the data in report will look like as shown below:

Classify Tracking Code using Rule Builder

Well explained on Guide to Using UTM Parameters in Adobe Analytics

I used following code to capture Tracking code:

s.usePlugins=true;
s.doPlugins=function(s) {

if(s.Util.getQueryParam(‘utm_medium’)){
s.campaign=s.Util.getQueryParam(‘utm_medium’)+”:”+s.Util.getQueryParam(‘utm_source’)+”:”+s.Util.getQueryParam(‘utm_campaign’)+”:”+s.Util.getQueryParam(‘utm_content’)+”:”+s.Util.getQueryParam(‘utm_term’);
}
s.campaign=s.getValOnce(s.campaign,’s_campaign’,0);

}

Then I set up the calssification in Analytics

Below is the screen shot:

Then under classification rule builder I did following setup using regx ^(.+)\:(.+)\:(.+)\:(.+)\:(.+)$

Sample value:

search:google:christmas:article:gifts

The above regex will not accept value if any one of the field is missing like search:google:christmas::gifts or :google:christmas::gifts

To fix this we have to use : ^(.*)\:(.*)\:(.*)\:(.*)\:(.*)$

For reference check Adobe Doc

For testing, you can use https://rubular.com/

How To Set up a local web-server on your computer

You will need to host a sample website for the hands-on lab. The sample PHP web pages will be provided during the session.

You can host the site in your local server (localhost) if you already have one configured on your computer. You can also use an online web-host if you have access to. Skip this Exercise in that case.

The following steps will guide you install a local web-server on your computer.

Objective:

Successfully Download and install a local-server software. Verify access to their default home page in your web browser.

Steps:

We will use XAMPP in this example. XAMPP is a very easy to install Apache Distribution of Linux, Solaris, Windows, and Mac OS X. The package includes the Apache web server, MySQL, PHP, Perl, an FTP server and phpMyAdmin. With that, you can have fun with your own website/scripting experiments in future with XAMPP on your machine.

(Alternatively, you can choose to install any popular package such as LAMP, WAMP, MAMP etc.)

  1. Download latest XAMPP software from: https://www.apachefriends.org/download.html
  2. Install with default settings. Just notice the directory where it’s getting installed (e.g. C:\XAMPP)
  3. After install, open the “XAMPP Control” app in your computer. Then start “Apache”:
  • Apache server should start with default ports: 80/443:

That’s your local web-server switched On!

  • Troubleshooting: If Apache could not start on default ports, probably something (e.g. IIS, Skype etc.) was blocking/using the default ports.

Consider changing the ports configured for Apache (try using some other ports e.g. 88 and 488). You can do that by clicking on “Config” and then editing and saving the files: httpd.conf and httpd-ssl.conf:

In those configuration files, find the line that mentions Listening on the ports (80 in httpd.conf and 443 in httpd-ssl.conf) and change those numbers (you can try 88 and 444 respectively).

After you save those two configuration files. Re-start with Step#3 (Starting Apache)

  • After a successful start of Apache, in your browser, type “localhost” as the URL and proceed. If you had used a port other than the default, you will need to add the port number to the URL separated by colon e.g. “localhost:88

You should be redirected to XAMPP Dashboard and see a welcome page like this:

(with default settings)

(with HTTP port changed to 88)

  • Locate your XAMPP install directory in your computer. You should see a sub-directory “htdocs“:

Your websites and web pages usually reside in that sub-directory. We will come back to this during the Lab.

How To Cross Verify Marketing Channel through Data Feed

1.Pull following column through data feed:

exclude_hit        

va_closer_detail              

va_closer_id      

va_detail            

va_finder_detail              

va_finder_id      

va_instance_event          

va_master_id    

va_new_engagement

2.Apply filter on column exclude_hit=0

3.Apply filter on column va_new_engagement=1

4.Apply filter on column va_closer_id=channel ID

Notice: The count should match to reports

Data Feed column reference